In the News

Hillsboro toasts groundbreaking on new community

Massive South Hillsboro project breaks ground; welcome mat out for 20,000 people

By Allan Brettman | The Oregonian/OregonLive  on August 06, 2016

“When Metro added South Hillsboro to the urban growth area in 2010, its intent was to address the region’s pressing housing needs, said Andy Shaw, Metro Regional Affairs Manager.”

An earth-moving truck rumbled behind Jesse Lovrien as he spoke with a reporter, proof that the largest planned residential development in Oregon history is at last becoming a reality after 15 years of politicking and planning.

“We’re moving about 600,000 yards (of dirt) in our first phase,” said Lovrien, vice president of operations for Newland Communities, the lead developer of Reed’s Crossing. “Moving from high spots to the low spots.”

Reed’s Crossing will be the first development in the much bigger and broader planned residential community known for now as South Hillsboro.

When fully built over the next two decades, South Hillsboro’s 1,400 acres will be home to roughly 20,000 residents. Approximately 8,000 homes of all types – large houses, small houses, townhouses, condominiums and apartments – are planned for the former farmland.

The South Hillsboro Community Plan also calls for 286 acres of new parks and open space, with 15 miles of new, multi-use trails linked to schools that will be built in the community. South Hillsboro – a placeholder name likely to be replaced with something more marketable — also is expected to include a state-of-the-art transportation network to accommodate motor vehicles, bicycles and expanded transit service.

Construction had at one point been scheduled to start in 2014. Stumbling blocks arose. Then construction was slated to start in 2015. Then more stumbling blocks.

Not this time.

Tuesday morning, Hillsboro Mayor Jerry Willey will lead a ground-breaking ceremony at the construction site – a symbolic coda for Willey. Term limits will prevent the mayor, first elected in November 2008, from seeking another four-year term. South Hillsboro has been in the works for Willey’s entire administration to this point.

The development could push Hillsboro past Gresham to become the state’s fourth-largest city. (After Portland, Eugene and Salem.) More importantly to the Metro regional government, it would add a whole lot of housing capacity to the Portland area at a time population continues to surge and home prices are rising fast.

“With all the jobs increasing in the area, the city is desperate to increase housing so people will not commute long distances to their homes,” said Hillsboro planning director Colin Cooper.

Earth moving began July 18 at the northern edge of the site, along Tualatin Valley Highway. The southern edge will roughly be Southwest Rosedale Road with 209th Avenue on the east, 229th on the west. The early work is expected to accommodate $40 million in construction of two, new main arterials: an extension of Cornelius Pass Road into the site, connecting with an east-west arterial linking Southeast Alexander Street on the west and Southwest Blanton Street on the east.

Homes built by Newland Communities – in the project called Reed’s Crossing — will be the first of three major residential construction components.

Lovrien, the Newland vice president, stood in the dusty field on a recent day and rattled off the project’s particulars.

“Approximately 3,800 single family units with an additional 600 to 900 multi-family units and 90 acres of mixed-use with a town center right in the middle of it,” Lovrien said. “We’ll be building amenities to the town center (and) open spaces.”

Reed’s Crossing’s name was inspired by Simeon Reed, the Portland liberal arts college namesake who once owned the property where the development will take place. Reed’s partner in the farm was William Ladd, the former Portland mayor who created Ladd’s Addition in the 1890s. The area where South Hillsboro will be built was once known as Reedville.

The first houses on the 422-acre Reed’s Crossing site, however, are not likely to be built until early- to mid-2018, Lovrien said, even though a website for the property says homes may be available in 2017.

When they are available, development fees to pay for new public infrastructure in the area will average about $52,000 per house, said Jamie Howsley, an attorney at Jordan Ramis representing Pahlisch Homes, one of two other large developers now involved in South Hillsboro.

“We’re building basically a new city the size of Forest Grove,” Howsley said. “It will have new parks, roads, sewers, water. To the extent everything will be new, that stuff will be passed on to the eventual home buyer.”

Pahlisch Homes will be building on 120 acres on the western side of the South Hillsboro site. Developer Joe Hanauer will build on a 189-acre site south of the Newland-led development.

“When I acquired it, I never had any view of developing it by itself,” Hanauer said of the property he’s held since the early 1990s. “I always felt it should be part of a larger master plan.”

Hanauer said he is surprised the length of time it has taken to reach the point of development, though.

“When I acquired this property I always thought it would be a longer-term investment,” he said. “But I didn’t expect it to be 23 to 24 years.”

The development of South Hillsboro comes none too early for Gerard Mildner, Portland State University associate professor of real estate finance, who says the project is desperately needed because of the region’s housing shortage.

“We need to be producing more housing units,” Mildner said. “We’ve been building at about 6,000 a year. We need to build more like 11,000 per year as a four-county region.”

Mildner faulted Metro, the regional government that controls the urban growth boundary, for its role in the housing crunch.

“The Metro Council has been deluded into thinking we can solve the housing for in-migrants with high density housing,” he said. “What they don’t realize is that high density costs money.” Mildner said, for example, the cost per square foot in a five story apartment building is about double that of apartments in a one-story structure.

When Metro added South Hillsboro to the urban growth area in 2010, its intent was to address the region’s pressing housing needs, said Andy Shaw, Metro Regional Affairs Manager.

“It’s taken a little while and Hillsboro has had to contend with some pretty significant infrastructure costs, but we’re excited to see the project take shape,” Shaw said.

Read original article on OregonLive

Celebrating a successful partnership on 124th Ave

One of the things that makes Washington County special is that we work together to get things done. The Joint Willamette Water Supply Pipeline and Washington County 124th Avenue Extension Project is a prime example of the spirit of partnership and collaboration that define this community. Two different infrastructure projects, by different agencies, became one project as the result of discussions among local governments seeking to work more efficiently on behalf of the county’s residents and businesses.

The first project has been developing over decades in anticipation of planned growth and the need to provide long-term water supplies for future generations. Tualatin Valley Water District and the City of Hillsboro have been working together for many years to develop the Willamette Water Supply System as the next reliable water source for our region. As a result of this teamwork, the Willamette Water Supply System will meet one of Oregon’s most important challenges — designed to supply water to more than 300,000 residents and some of the state’s largest employers for the next 100 years. The effort is ongoing, and over the next several years, local jurisdictions will work together to coordinate all aspects of this large and complex endeavor, including planning, engineering, financing, public outreach and permitting requirements.

The second project, Washington County’s 124th Avenue Extension, includes a $30 million, two-lane arterial between Tualatin-Sherwood and Grahams Ferry roads, with safety improvements to other area roads, resulting in 4.4 miles of new and/or improved roadway. The extension will provide another route connecting Tualatin and Wilsonville, along with access to land designated for future industrial and employment development in Tualatin, Sherwood and Wilsonville. As private development occurs, the road will eventually be widened to five lanes.

At one point in the planning process, it became apparent to everyone involved that these two projects had some common interests and related work that needed to take place in the same right-of-way. Washington County teamed up with the Willamette Water Supply Program to create a combined project that will build the 124th Avenue road extension and lay the water pipeline in the road right-of-way. Eventually, the pipeline will connect to the Willamette Water Supply System that’s currently under design. The partnership will reduce traffic and construction impacts, saving taxpayers and ratepayers millions of dollars.

Last week, Washington County, along with the cities of Hillsboro, Sherwood, Tualatin and Wilsonville, plus TVWD and Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, celebrated the spirit of these partnerships. On Nov. 12, the county and the Willamette Water Supply Program broke ground for the 124th Avenue roadway and pipeline project. It was an historic event as we all came together as partners to support our region’s reliable future and continue our long, productive relationships for the benefit of the citizens and businesses of Washington County.

Andy Duyck, Chairman, Washington County Board of Commissioners

Read original article in Beaverton Valley Times

Ground broken for 124th Ave. extension, Willamette River pipeline

Local and county officials braved a rain and chilly temperatures Thursday afternoon to break ground on a future extension of Southwest 124th Avenue, an expected shortcut for some Tualatin-Sherwood Road motorists to Interstate 5 and a home for a 30-mile-long pipeline to provide Hillsboro with its future drinking water, taken from the Willamette River at Wilsonville.

Plans for the $30 million road extension are to build a north-to-south route from Tualatin-Sherwood Road to Tonquin Road. Once that extension intersects with Tonquin Road (2,000 feet east of Morgan Road), it will cross that roadway, creating a new road that will run parallel to Tonquin before connecting with Grahams Ferry Road.

Work on the road — which will be a five-lane arterial once all development along that roadway is completed — and pipeline are expected to begin April 2016 with a completion date set for 2018.

Andy Duyck, chairman of the Washington County Board of Commissioners told those gathered for the groundbreaking that the 124th Avenue extension would reduce freight congestion while still opening 1,700 acres to industrial development in one of the most significant projects involving the I-5 corridor in recent history. Duyck said building the roadway while placing the water pipeline in the ground at the same time will save ratepayers and taxpayers “tons of money.”

Tualatin Mayor Lou Ogden said an I-5 connector has been discussed for the last 40 years. While this isn’t the connector or bypass discussed, Ogden said it’s the only current project that will benefit freight traffic. Ogden praised both Washington County Commissioner Roy Rogers and Wilsonville Mayor Tim Knapp for helping to move the project forward.

He then took a jab at the Willamette River pipeline project, joking, “We don’t drink Willamette Water in Tualatin … because we want to live a long life.”

Countering Odgen good-naturedly, Wilsonville Mayor Tim Knapp said Hillsboro will soon have a reliable, high quality source of water once the pipeline is completed. Both Wilsonville and Sherwood use Willamette River water, as does a Coca-Cola bottling plant in Wilsonville, which bottles Dasani brand water. “You’re already drinking Willamette River water,” Knapp told Ogden.

Sherwood Mayor Krisanna Clark said the 124th Avenue extension would provide a relief for traffic congestion and allow businesses to more easily get their products to market.

Clark said two parcels are on the cusp of being brought in for future development in Sherwood’s Tonquin Employment Area. In 2012, Sherwood voters approved annexing 300 acres of that area into city limits. Now individual property owners must request to be annexed and two landowners have expressed an interest.

The Tonquin Employment Area property is earmarked for small to mid-size manufacturers who ideally will create more than 3,000 jobs, according to Sherwood city officials.

Meanwhile, Clark said she often talks to Sherwood residents who think that Roy Rogers Road has always been around. That hasn’t been the case, she pointed out, saying she hopes that years from now, people can’t remember a time when the 124th Avenue extension wasn’t there and say “this is a job well done.”

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Chief Mike Duyck praised the new Willamette River pipeline, saying it was being built with earthquake prevention in mind, something that will help avoid disruption during a future earthquake predicted for the region.

Tualatin Valley Water District Board President Marilyn McWilliams said the modified intake system and pipeline will provide for the next water source for the region by building a resilient water supply.

Read original article in The Sherwood Gazette

Groundbreaking set for 124th Ave. extension to Graham’s Ferry Road

“The first section of the more than 30-mile-long Willamette Water Supply system will be installed in the new road right-of-way. It is the first section of the earthquake-resilient water transmission pipeline to be built as part of the Willamette Water Supply Program.”

The Washington County Department of Land Use & Transportation will host a groundbreaking ceremony the extension of 124th Avenue is set for Thursday, Nov. 12 at 1 p.m. The ceremony, which will also recognize a water project that will pipe Willamette River water from Wilsonville to Hillsboro, is set for the south side south side of Tualatin-Sherwood Road and Southwest 124th Avenue.

The $30 million road project will extend 124th Avenue south from Tualatin-Sherwood Road to Tonquin Road. Once the extension intersects with Tonquin Road (2,000 feet east of Morgan Road), it will cross with a new road that will run parallel to Tonquin before connecting with Grahams Ferry Road.

Expected speakers at the ceremony include Andy Duyck, chairman of the Washington County Board of Commissioners; Lou Ogden, mayor of Tualatin; Krisanna Clark, mayor of Sherwood; Tim Knapp, mayor of Wilsonville; Mike Duyck, fire chief for Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue; and Marilyn McWilliams, board president for Tualatin Valley Water District.

The new road and pipeline highlights partnerships between the Willamette Water Supply Program and Washington County, along with the cities of Sherwood, Tualatin, Wilsonville and Hillsboro.

Officials say by combining the two major projects through interagency collaboration, traffic and construction impacts will be minimized, and both agencies will save money by reducing construction and project management costs.

In addition, the Willamette Water Supply Program and Washington County continue to work together to identify future opportunities to partner on additional sections of the water transmission pipeline.

For the city of Sherwood, the 124th Avenue extension is important for economic reasons.

In 2012, Sherwood voters approved annexing 300 acres of property as part of what’s known as the Tonquin Employment Area with plans to create a light industrial zone for future production-type employment along 124th Avenue. The 1.3-mile roadway is part of the Basalt Creek Transportation Refinement Plan.

Safety improvements also will be made to sections of Tonquin and Grahams Ferry roads, totaling 4.4 miles of new and/or improved roadway.

Construction for both the road and pipeline projects is scheduled to begin later this year and be completed in 2018.

The Willamette Water Supply Program will fund the pipeline construction and a proportionate share of other project costs.

Washington County’s Major Streets Transportation Improvement Program (MSTIP) will fund road construction work.

The first section of the more than 30-mile-long Willamette Water Supply system will be installed in the new road right-of-way. It is the first section of the earthquake-resilient water transmission pipeline to be built as part of the Willamette Water Supply Program.

— Ray Pitz

Read original article in The Times

 

Unlikely Source Keeps Willamette Valley Fertile In Drought

By Eric Tegethoff  OPB  (Oct. 26, 2015)

“We’ve got this big, deep, huge volcanic aquifer,” said Grant. “I can’t find another place on the planet that has the same kind of properties as our place does.”--U.S. Forest Service Research Hydrologist Gordon Grant 

When summer began this year, signs weren’t good for water in the Willamette River Basin.

Record low snow packs had already melted, spring precipitation was well below average, and — for some cities — it had been the hottest June on record.

By the time summer was over, the Detroit Lake Reservoir had dried up to an unprecedented level. And according to the Department of Agriculture, Oregon is still experiencing severe drought.

But U.S. Forest Service Research Hydrologist Gordon Grant said the record-setting conditions haven’t stopped water from flowing to the Willamette River.

He said that river systems in states like California are struggling with drought because they rely on melting snowpacks and reservoirs.

Meanwhile, the Willamette basin has an extra leg to stand on.

“We’ve got this big, deep, huge volcanic aquifer,” said Grant. “I can’t find another place on the planet that has the same kind of properties as our place does.”

Given the conditions, which Grant said were equivalent to what we might see if the planet warmed 4 degrees, scientists had predicted the Willamette would hit record low levels.

When that wasn’t the case, hydrologists started thinking about why.

The most likely candidate was this deep volcanic aquifer.

Not much is known about the aquifer, except that it acts like a giant underground sponge seeping into the river through groundwater.

No one is sure how it will react if the drought continues either.

However, Grant said that climate change models for the region might have to take the large water supply into account.

Read original article on OPB

Water wizards ready to juggle local supply

A strong El Niño season could mean another dry year for western Washington County

Before Victoria Lowe became a Forest Grove city councilor, she battled drought and water scarcity in Nevada and Texas.

After her arrival in Oregon, Lowe’s interest in protecting Forest Grove’s watershed drove her into the political arena, where she now hopes to spare Washington County residents from similar water shortages in the face of Oregon’s current drought.

“I would like to think about conservation before the last drop comes out of the pipe,” Lowe said recently.

Thankfully, western Washington County’s current situation isn’t that dire.

But without careful planning and citizen cooperation, it could be a lot worse than it is.

Continue reading Water wizards ready to juggle local supply

Last vestige of the Westside Bypass finally takes shape

By Dana Tims The Oregonian/OregonLive
(July 10, 2015)

But that’s exactly what’s getting underway in southern Tualatin as work gears up on the last vestige of the fabled but fated Westside Bypass.

“I’m not trying to overstate this or be melodramatic,” said Lou Ogden, Tualatin’s mayor for the past 20 years. “But this is a huge deal for both us and, from a transportation standpoint, the most important thing to happen to Tualatin during my time here.”

Continue reading Last vestige of the Westside Bypass finally takes shape

Governor Brown Declares ‘Water Awareness Month’

July’s proclamation encourages all Oregonians to use water wisely

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown today declared July “Water Awareness Month.” With 20 counties under emergency drought declarations and approximately 98 percent of the state experiencing drought, Governor Brown is directing all state agencies to assist the Oregon Water Resources Department in increasing awareness about Oregon’s water resources challenges.

“I am asking all Oregonians to do their part to use water wisely,” said Governor Brown. “Water is the foundation for local economies and ecosystems, and essential to the health and well-being of Oregonians. Drought is a slow moving disaster, adopting responsible water use practices now will help reduce the impact of drought for years to come.”

The proclamation cites as causes for concern the lowest statewide snowpack level on record; the third warmest average temperature from January to May in the past 121 years; and below normal rainfall. The proclamation also recognizes some climate scientists’ prediction that over the next 50 years Oregon is likely to lose most of its snowpack and become a rain dominated system.

Continue reading Governor Brown Declares ‘Water Awareness Month’

Willamette Water Supply Program begins constructing pipeline in partnership with Washington County’s 124th Avenue Extension Project

Willamette Water Supply Program partners, City of Hillsboro and Tualatin Valley Water District (TVWD), are teaming up with Washington County to construct nearly 2.7 miles of a large-diameter drinking water transmission pipeline in conjunction with the County’s 124th Avenue Extension road project. This is the first section of the more than 30-mile water transmission pipeline to be built as part of the Willamette Water Supply Program.

The water transmission pipeline project will start at SW Tualatin-Sherwood Road and continue south, then continue east along SW Tonquin Road, then continue south on SW Grahams Ferry Road, ending near SW Day Road. The road project includes extending 124th Avenue south from Tualatin-Sherwood Road across Tonquin Road, then continuing east to Grahams Ferry Road. Road improvements will also be made to sections of Tonquin Road and Grahams Ferry Road.

The Willamette Water Supply Program will fund the pipeline construction and a proportionate share of other project costs. The County’s Major Streets Transportation Improvement Program (MSTIP) will fund road construction work. Construction for this collaborative pipeline and roadway project is scheduled to begin fall 2015 with completion anticipated to occur by the end of 2017.

Continue reading Willamette Water Supply Program begins constructing pipeline in partnership with Washington County’s 124th Avenue Extension Project